Pennsylvania Unemployment Insurance Weekly Benefits

Unfortunately, with the downturn in the economy, there is a severe increase in the number of people who are filing for jobless benefits. However, you must know a few things before you visit your Pennsylvania Unemployment Office, so you are more ready for the process, the paperwork and the requirements. Filing for your jobless benefits is often very confusing and difficult. It appears that it simply compounds strain of not having a job, and just draws on your self-esteem and confidence. Despite this, before you start your paperwork to file for laid-off benefits at your PA unemployment office, you can effortlessly register on their website and attempt to find a new job at the two websites that they provide employment information.

Determining Your Benefits Amount

Base Year and Benefit Year

The base period is the time period during which wages earned and/or hours/weeks worked are examined to determine a worker’s monetary right to unemployment insurance. Almost all states utilize the first 4 of the last 5 completed calendar quarters prior to filing of the claim as their base period.

The benefit year is a 1-year or 52-week period for the period of which a worker may collect benefits based on a previous period of employment. In all states, the starting date of the benefit year depends on when a worker initially filed a “valid claim,” meaning the worker employment requirements and minimal wage.

Extended Base Periods (EBP)

A number of states permit workers who have no wages in the current base period to make use of older wages and employment under definite conditions. These situations usually involve injury or illness.

For instance, a worker who was hurt during the job and who has obtained workers’ compensation benefits may use wages and employment and wages before the date of the worker’s injury to ascertain eligibility. Some state laws may describe these base periods as “alternative” base periods.

In Pennsylvania, EBP is the last 4 completed quarters immediately prior to the date of the injury if the worker was qualified for worker’s current BP (Base period).

Qualifying Wages or Employment

All states need a worker to have earned a definite amount of wages or to have worked for a definite period of time (or both) within the base period to be financially eligible to collect any UI benefits. Most workers are entitled for benefits based on employment and wages in a single state. On the other hand, some workers who work in more than one state will not have adequate employment and wages in any single state to set up monetary eligibility, or would be entitled for a smaller WBA. Workers with wages and employment in more than one state can opt to file a claim combining wages and employment earned in all states where they worked into a claim filed under the law of any of the states they worked.

To make sure you qualify for benefits, check out PA unemployment eligibility section.

The qualifying formula for wages and employment used by Pennsylvania is 16 credit weeks and at least 20% BPW (Base period wage) out of HQ (High quarter).

The minimum wages needed to qualify for UI in Pennsylvania is $800 for high quarter and $1,320 for base period.

Weekly Amount Benefit

After settling on if a worker has adequate wages and/or employment to be eligible for UI benefits, it is important to determine the weekly benefit amount- the sum payable for a week of total unemployment will be. Unemployment insurance is designed to offer partial wage replacement. For this reason, all workers do not obtain the same benefit amount.

Methods of Calculating Weekly Benefits:


Pennsylvania uses the high quarter method to calculate the weekly benefit amounts.

High-Quarter Method: This quarter is viewed as the period most nearly reflecting fulltime work for the worker. By dividing this sum by 13- the number of weeks in a calendar quarter-the average weekly wage is computed. Depending on the percentage of the weekly wage in the state intends to substitute, the weekly wage is divided and the weekly benefit is computed.

Method of calculating and formula for Pennsylvania is:

HQ (High Quarter Formula)

1/23 – 1/25 + DA (Dependent’s Allowance)

The minimum weekly benefit amount is $35-$43 and the maximum ranges from $573 – $581.

The minimum wages required for maximum WBA:

  • High quarter-$14,898
  • Base period- $22,840

Waiting Period

Workers who are otherwise entitled for benefits should first serve a waiting period in most of the states. In many states, the waiting period condition for weeks of partial unemployment is the same as for weeks of total unemployment. The waiting period is served in or with respect to a particular benefit year. When a worker, after intervening employment, has an added spell of unemployment that continues beyond the end of the first benefit year, the worker may not have to provide another waiting week if he is financially eligible for benefits in the second year.

Benefits for Partial Unemployment

Frequently, instead of being laid-off, workers may have their hours reduced during an economic recession. Or jobless workers may get short-term work while seeking for a permanent full-time job. These conditions describe partial unemployment.

In Pennsylvania,

  • Definition of Partial Unemployment – week of less than full-time work if earnings are less than WBA + 2/5 WBA
  • Earnings Disregarded in computing weekly benefit for partial unemployment: Greater of $6 or 2/5 WBA

Dependent’s Allowances

Though wages brought in during the base period is the most important factor in determining the size of the payment a claimant obtains each week, some states’ laws offer a dependent’s allowance above and beyond the basic benefit amount payable. The meaning of dependent, for UI purposes, differs from state to state as does the allowance granted. In general, a dependent must be wholly or mainly assisted mainly or wholly by the worker or living with or acquiring usual assistance by the worker.

All states with dependents’ allowances comprise children under a specified age. In the state of Pennsylvania the maximum number of dependents allowed is 2.

Duration of Benefits

When states calculate a worker’s financial eligibility for benefits, in addition to computing the weekly benefit amount, they determine the period of benefits- how long benefits can be received. The duration is normally measured as a number of weeks of total unemployment. Maximum weeks of benefits differ from 26 to 30 weeks, most frequently 26 weeks.

In state of Pennsylvania, a worker with no less than 18 credit weeks is qualified for 26 weeks; with at least 16 credit weeks. A credit week is the one in which claimant earned at least $50.

Non-monitary Eligibility

Apart from wages earned, PA requires you to meet certain employment criteria in order to receive the benefits.

Primarily, you must have lost job through no fault of your own. Even if you give up job because of low pay or because you have a long commute, you are usually not eligible. If you are preparing to stop, ensure you realize this fact. There are some unusual situations such as unfriendly work environment in which case you may get the unemployment insurance if you are able to confirm it so.

Second criterion is that you should be healthy and able to work. In case you have physical hardship, then you may not be entitled and if you have disability insurance you should get in touch with your insurance provider to obtain any compensation. You are also needed to enthusiastically search for work even though you are not getting favorable replies. If you need more details on this, refer to PA unemployment eligibility guide.

Pennsylvania requires no less than 16 weeks of covered employment (employer should have paid unemployment taxes on your part). You may be not qualified for the benefits if you take part in a work stoppage that is decided by the Department to be a strike.

You may be ineligible for benefits if you fail to take part in re-employment services to which you have been referred through the claimant profiling system. The claimant profiling system has been intended to make out claimants who may benefit the maximum from reemployment services, if chosen; you must take part in this obligatory program of reemployment services.

If you have met the entire eligibility criterion, then you can get ready with paperwork to file the application. Though you can file by mail or phone, online application is the most accurate method to apply for benefits.

Watch this video to know more about Pennsylvania Unemployment Claims.

14 thoughts on “Pennsylvania Unemployment Insurance Weekly Benefits

  1. Sue

    I have a full time employee who also collects social security. If he is involved in a partial reduction in hours must he claim his social security benefit?

    Reply
    1. Rashmi

      If your company has cut your hours, based on the number of hours cut, you might be eligible for unemployment benefits. Typically, if eligible for social security, the number of hours worked will reduce the total weekly amount paid to you.

      Reply
  2. Pingback: Unemployment Wages Payment Method in Pennsylvania

  3. harvey fell

    I was working in a job in which I was being paid gross $1,000 per week.

    My current job I make gross $600 per week

    Both jobs were 40 hours and the reason leaving the first job I was not getting paid on time.

    Reply
    1. Rashmi

      If you have wages for past 18 months with the eligibility of working hours then you should be able to get the UI Benefits.

      Reply
  4. Jon

    Im dealing with he said she said comments at my work. The comments were parts of conversations that I heard on the floor. When I went to get clarity on the comments the associate reported me as making rude comments. Even though I have never had a history of this with my company or pervious ones they instantly put me on a final for performance with no other documentation on any other incidents. I did not sign it and currently contesting it. I was told if I make any error I will be fired (not just employee comments). Im in retail so I am required to do a lot. They could easily get me for anything because I am not perfect. If something happens and I lose my job can I get unemployment?

    Reply
  5. Rashmi

    Generally, if you are fired or quit then you will not be eligible. It is better to search for other job and change the company.

    Reply
    1. Deborah

      That is not true Rashmi. You could potentially get unemployment if you lost your job through no fault of your own. If a person is fired then the onus is on the employer to prove that they had ‘just cause” for firing that person. The person must have intentionally done something fairly serious for it to be deemed just cause. Minor errors made infrequently do not qualify as grounds for dismissal. Also there are some scenarios where if a person quit they would also get benefits. Some of the scenarios are: moved to follow spouses job, being harassed at work, etc. The difference if you quit is that the onus shifts to you and you will have to prove that you had just cause to quit your employment.

      Reply
  6. Krista

    Will I be eligible for unemployment if I leave my current job due to my husband being in the military and having to relocate the family? I’ve been at my job for 10 and a half years and may have leave in the next few months.

    Reply
  7. diane rock

    i had alota occurrences with the co.i was with,and they finally let me go.my supervisior said that it would be written that we “seperated”and that i could use him as a refferance.does being”seperated “qualify as being fired? cus he said thats what would be put on my personal record.and do i qualifiy for ui beniefeits?

    Reply
  8. buddy

    I am 60 and quit my job due to I am able to collect suvivior benefits .More then if I was to work at my job.I was told even tho I quit my job and waiting on my first check,I can sign up for unemployment.Is this true?

    Reply
  9. Patricia

    Just called the unemployment office on 5 -7-13. My weekly amount will be 179.00· Is that all wilt 2 depends.

    Reply
  10. Bill Gergely

    I will be 69 on Christmas, collecting Social Security and working part time selling cars three days a week. I will be getting surgery on January 16, 2014 and will be off my part time work for 2 months. Am I eligible for medical disability?

    Reply
    1. Bill Gergely

      I will be 69 on Christmas, collecting Social Security and working part time selling cars three days a week. I will be getting surgery on January 16, 2014 and will be off my part time work for 2 months. Am I eligible for medical disability?

      Reply

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